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SMEs BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES: BRISBANE 2032 OLYMPIC GAMES

SMEs BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES: BRISBANE 2032 OLYMPIC GAMES Author: Francine Tavares Imagine the excitement and prestige of being part of the Brisbane 2032 Olympic Games. Not only does it open doors to incredible business opportunities, but it also positions your company on a high stage.   Getting your business match-fit for the Brisbane 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games means aligning with the Queensland Government’s standards for successful suppliers: being local, sustainable, ethical, and diverse.   ESG and the Brisbane 2032 Olympic Games   The Brisbane 2032 Olympics present an opportunity for businesses to integrate Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) principles into business strategy. The Games are not just about sports but also about environmental and social impact. The Q2032 Procurement Strategy presents a guide to helping Queensland businesses become match-fit. Here’s how businesses can start their journey: 1. Climate Positive Commitment (Environmental- E) The Brisbane 2032 Games aim to be the first climate-positive Olympics, which means: 30% Reduction in Emissions: From 2005 levels by 2030. Net Zero Emissions: By 2050. Over 80% of the Games’ emissions are expected to come from supply chains.  Sustainable procurement is a key to a successful supplier, businesses are encouraged to: Sustainability Practices: Implementing sustainable practices such as reducing carbon emissions, using eco-friendly materials, and promoting energy efficiency. Waste Management: Developing comprehensive waste management plans to reduce, reuse, and recycle materials. 2. Social Impact (Social- S) Supporting Local Communities Community Engagement: Supporting local communities by hiring locally, engaging with community projects, and ensuring fair wages and working conditions. Modern Slavery Prevention: Addressing modern slavery risks in vulnerable industries. Diverse Suppliers: Encouraging procurement from small and medium enterprises, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander businesses, social enterprises, women-owned businesses, culturally and linguistically diverse suppliers and businesses owned or operated by people with disabilities.  3. Transparent Procurement Processes- Governance-G Ethical Practices: Adhering to ethical standards, including transparency in operations, compliance with labour laws, and preventing modern slavery. Accountability: Regularly reporting on ESG metrics and demonstrating continuous improvement in sustainability and social practices. The success of the Brisbane 2032 Games relies on collaboration between the government, businesses, and communities. The Domino Effect:  ESG Compliance Across the Supply Chain To truly understand how SMEs can prepare to support their clients for the Brisbane 2032 Olympic Games, let’s dive into a practical example of sustainable practice involving two fictional SMEs: SportZone Rentals and SparkleClean Services. SportZone Rentals is an SME based in Queensland, specialising in renting out sports centres and facilities for various events. They have been contracted by a large event management company, MegaEvents, which has been selected to organise and manage sports venues for the Brisbane 2032 Olympic Games. To maintain the high standards required for the Games, MegaEvents also contracts SparkleClean Services, a local cleaning company, to provide cleaning services for the sports centres managed by SportZone Rentals. The Domino Effect: Because MegaEvents is a direct supplier for the Games, they need to ensure that all their subcontractors, including SportZone Rentals and SparkleClean Services, meet the Games’ ESG (Environmental, Social, and Governance) topics. Steps SportZone Rentals and SparkleClean Services Need to Take 1. Understand ESG Requirements: Both SportZone Rentals and SparkleClean Services need to understand the specific ESG requirements set by the Brisbane 2032, which MegaEvents must adhere to. This includes: Implementing sustainable practices in facility management and cleaning services Decarbonisation plan roadmap Reducing energy consumption, water, and waste. Ensuring ethical labour practices, diversity and inclusion. Report 2. Implement Sustainable Practices: SportZone Rentals and SparkleClean Services must ensure their operations align with these requirements: Energy Efficiency Project: Install energy-efficient lighting, heating, solar panel, and cooling systems in all sports centres. Waste Reduction: Implement recycling programs and reduce single-use plastics and other waste materials. Sustainable Materials: Use sustainable materials for any renovations or upgrades to the facilities. Eco-Friendly Products: Use environmentally friendly cleaning products that are biodegradable and non-toxic. Waste Reduction: Implement recycling programs and minimise waste by using reusable cleaning materials. Reduce water use, electricity. Plan to reduce emissions 3. Reporting and Documentation: To support MegaEvents, SportZone Rentals and SparkleClean Services must provide regular reports demonstrating their compliance with ESG goals, example: Energy Consumption: Track and report energy usage and the measures taken to reduce it. Waste Management: Document recycling efforts and the reduction of waste materials. Sustainable Materials: Record the use of sustainable materials and their sources. Decarbonisation plan: calculate carbon emissions and create KPIs to track reduction. Chemical Usage: Track and report the usage of eco-friendly cleaning products. Waste Management: Document recycling efforts and the reduction of disposable cleaning materials. Energy Consumption: Report the use of energy-efficient cleaning equipment and practices. Decarbonisation plan: calculate carbon emissions and create KPIs to track reduction.   Conclusion   Ready to be part of this journey? The Brisbane 2032 Olympic Games offer a golden opportunity and competitive advantage to showcase your commitment to sustainability and social impact. By aligning with these standards, you can enhance your business reputation, making your company more attractive to potential clients.   Get match-fit and join the team! Stay informed, make a difference! Join us in our mission for a sustainable future. Acess our insights and subscribe to our newsletter and stay up-to-date with the latest sustainability news, tips, and trends. Together, let’s create a green and social economy for all. Notice: JavaScript is required for this content. Uncategorized SMEs BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES: BRISBANE 2032 OLYMPIC GAMES 11/07/2024 Read More Uncategorized Celebrating LGBTQIA+ Pride: A Global Commitment to Inclusion 01/07/2024 Read More Load More

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Celebrating LGBTQIA+ Pride: A Global Commitment to Inclusion

Celebrating LGBTQIA+ Pride: A Global Commitment to Inclusion Author: Adriana Ferreira As we commemorate LGBTQIA+ Pride Day, it’s essential to reflect on the progress made towards equality and recognize the work still needed to create inclusive environments. At Conexus Earth, we are committed to fostering diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). This day is not only a celebration but also a reminder of our collective responsibility to support LGBTQIA+ communities in the workplace and beyond. Understanding LGBTQIA+ Pride Pride Day is a significant event for the LGBTQIA+ community, symbolizing the fight for equal rights and the celebration of diversity. It marks the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, a pivotal moment in the LGBTQIA+ rights movement. Pride Day is celebrated with parades, events, and activities that promote visibility, acceptance, and the rights of LGBTQIA+ individuals. LGBTQIA+ Inclusion Matters in the Workplace because diverse teams and psychological work environments promotes innovation and creativity, enhances Employee well-being and strengthens Company Reputation. How Companies Can Support LGBTQIA+ Inclusion Implement Inclusive Policies: Develop and enforce non-discrimination policies that protect LGBTQIA+ employees. Ensure these policies cover all aspects of employment, from hiring to promotions and benefits. Provide Training and Education: Offer regular DEI training that includes LGBTQIA+ issues. Educate employees on the importance of inclusivity and the impact of unconscious biases. Create Safe Spaces: Establish support groups or Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) for LGBTQIA+ employees. These groups can provide a safe space for discussion, support, and advocacy. Celebrate LGBTQIA+ Events: Recognize and celebrate important dates such as Pride Month, Transgender Day of Visibility, and others. Use these occasions to highlight LGBTQIA+ voices and stories. Review and Revise Benefits: Ensure that company benefits, such as health insurance and family leave, are inclusive of LGBTQIA+ needs, including coverage for same-sex partners and transgender health care. Encourage Allyship: Promote allyship within the organization. Encourage employees to support their LGBTQIA+ colleagues and advocate for their rights. Engage with the Community: Partner with LGBTQIA+ organizations and participate in community events. Show your company’s commitment to supporting broader societal inclusion. Global Perspective on LGBTQIA+ Inclusion LGBTQIA+ rights and acceptance vary widely across the globe. While some countries have made significant strides in legal protections and societal acceptance, others continue to face severe discrimination and persecution. Taking Action For Employees: Educate Yourself: Take the initiative to learn about LGBTQIA+ issues and history. Understanding the challenges faced by the community is the first step towards being an effective ally. Speak Up: Challenge discriminatory behaviors and language in the workplace. Support colleagues who may be facing discrimination. Participate in Events: Get involved in company and community events that celebrate and support LGBTQIA+ individuals. For Employers: Evaluate Your Practices: Regularly review company policies and practices to ensure they are inclusive and equitable. Support Advocacy Efforts: Use your platform to advocate for LGBTQIA+ rights and support organizations working towards equality. Lead by Example: Demonstrate your commitment to inclusion through your actions and leadership. Show that LGBTQIA+ inclusion is a priority at all levels of the organization. Stay informed, make a difference! Join us in our mission for a sustainable future. Acess our insights and subscribe to our newsletter and stay up-to-date with the latest sustainability news, tips, and trends. Together, let’s create a green and social economy for all. Notice: JavaScript is required for this content. Uncategorized Celebrating LGBTQIA+ Pride: A Global Commitment to Inclusion 01/07/2024 Read More Uncategorized The Transformative Impact of Rehabilitation Plans in Mining 13/06/2024 Read More Load More

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The Transformative Impact of Rehabilitation Plans in Mining

The Transformative Impact of Rehabilitation Plans in Mining Author: Adriana Ferreira Mining companies will have to consider and address the environmental and social impacts of their operations, which influence mine design, development, and closure. Starting in 2024, they’ll need to focus on additional ESG risk factors they haven’t looked at in as much depth before. In the past, mining companies often didn’t face accountability for their impact on the environment and communities, especially Indigenous ones. Preventing these potential negative long-term impacts before they occur needs to be a part of every mining company’s strategy and its environmental and social responsibility. New changes in national legislation will introduce mandatory ESG reporting requirements, covering climate-related financial disclosures, human rights protection, and environmental preservation. From the social and governance perspectives, human rights are fundamental factors of ESG, and communities are demanding more say in mining projects that affect– and will challenge more projects on these grounds. Implementing rehabilitation plans from the start of mining operations is key to ensuring a smooth and beneficial transition for local communities and ecosystems. An effective rehabilitation plan involves restoring mined lands to a more natural state or to new uses that benefit the community and the environment. This includes soil management, revegetation with native flora, restoration of habitats for wildlife, and treatment of contaminated waters. Moreover, rehabilitation plans often encompass social projects aimed at economically revitalizing local communities, creating new opportunities in sectors like eco-tourism, sustainable agriculture, and renewable energy generation.   Mine Rehabilitation: The Case of Kidston Clean Energy Hub in Australia   The Kidston Clean Energy Hub in Queensland, Australia, exemplifies the transformation of a former gold mine into a renewable energy complex. The Kidston Project was the first pumped hydro energy storage scheme globally to be developed in an abandoned gold mine. The project includes a contribution to the construction cost of the 186 km transmission line from the Kidston site to Mt Fox. This project not only rehabilitates the land but also supports the local community, particularly through its Indigenous Engagement Strategy (IES). Genex, the project’s proponent, has achieved notable success in indigenous employment, exceeding their target with 9.4% of the project’s workforce being Indigenous. They have actively collaborated with the Ewamian Aboriginal Corporation (EAC) to develop an approved Indigenous supplier database and encourage Indigenous supplier involvement. Furthermore, Genex supports Indigenous-led projects such as the Talaroo Hot Springs tourism precinct, underscoring their commitment to fostering opportunities and community development. The benefits of a well-implemented rehabilitation plan are broad and long-lasting. Local communities experience an economic and social revival, with the introduction of training and professional requalification programs. These initiatives help local people find new employment opportunities, promoting economic diversification and reducing reliance on mining.   Prioritizing ESG Initiatives   Rehabilitating mined areas isn’t merely a regulatory requirement but a strategic chance for mining companies to leave a positive legacy. With conscientious practices and strong community engagement, it’s feasible to transform landscapes and lives, demonstrating that responsible mining is not just viable but imperative for a sustainable future. Today, an ESG approach isn’t just preferred by investors and stakeholders; it’s also a risk-mitigation strategy. Companies will discover that by investing early in innovative methods, they save costs in the long run, enhance their reputation in the community, protect the environment and the communities who depend upon it. Source: https://www.naif.gov.au/our-projects/genex-kidston-pumped-hydro-storage-project/   Mine rehabilitation creating regional opportunities Stay informed, make a difference! Join us in our mission for a sustainable future. Acess our insights and subscribe to our newsletter and stay up-to-date with the latest sustainability news, tips, and trends. Together, let’s create a green and social economy for all. Notice: JavaScript is required for this content. The Transformative Impact of Rehabilitation Plans in Mining 13/06/2024 Read More Understanding Gender Equity: impacts and strategies for business success 31/05/2024 Read More Load More

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Understanding Gender Equity: impacts and strategies for business success

Understanding Gender Equity Impacts and strategies for business success​ Author: Belén Palkovsky Gender equity, a cornerstone of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI), extends beyond the notion of gender equality by acknowledging the unique needs and circumstances of different genders and providing the resources and opportunities necessary to achieve fair outcomes. Unlike gender equality, which treats everyone the same, equity aims to level the playing field so everyone can exercise their rights fully. This concept is crucial for several reasons. Economically, societies that promote gender equity are more prosperous and sustainable. Companies with gender-diverse leadership often experience better financial performance, higher employee engagement, and a wider range of innovative ideas. Socially, promoting gender equity helps reduce poverty and improve educational and health outcomes for communities. From a human rights perspective, gender equity ensures everyone has equal access to opportunities and freedoms. In Australia, despite significant progress, challenges remain. Women still face wage disparities, underrepresentation in leadership, and gender-based violence. The 2023 BCEC and WGEA report showed that the gender pay gap was 22.8% in 2022. Women are significantly underrepresented in top executive roles and on boards of directors, with only 16.7% of board chair positions held by women in 2022. Additionally, violence against women remains a serious social and public health issue. Addressing these challenges requires ongoing, informed efforts to promote gender equity through policy changes, education, and support services. Australian Gender Equity legislation Since the implementation of the Workplace Gender Equality Act in 2012, Australia has taken significant steps toward promoting gender equity in the workplace. This legislation mandates employers with 100 or more employees to report annually on gender equity practices to the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA). Key provisions include the requirement for businesses to report data on gender composition, pay structures, and diversity policies; conduct and report gender pay gap analyses; and develop action plans to address discrepancies. Compliance is closely monitored, with non-compliant businesses facing exclusion from government contracts and grants, alongside potential negative publicity. Since 2024, the WGEA has published companies’ gender equity reports, enhancing transparency and encouraging compliance through public pressure and stakeholder engagement. Moreover, despite policies promoting work-life balance, women often face significant challenges in balancing career and family responsibilities, affecting their career progression. Persistent challenges for women Recent reports from the WGEA show a persistent pay disparity of about 14%, highlighting insufficient policy implementation to combat inequalities in the corporate environment. Women make up only 30% of leadership positions in major companies listed on the ASX,, and the persistence of a pay gap means women still earn less than men for the same or equally valuable work. Work environments that do not adopt effective diversity and inclusion policies perpetuate stereotypes and discriminatory practices. That’s why creating an inclusive corporate culture requires commitment from leadership, ongoing education, and the implementation of policies that support diversity and inclusion at all levels of the organization. Despite these challenges, some progress has been made. Employers of Choice for Gender Equality (EOCGE) show faster progress in closing gender pay gaps and implementing supportive work environments. EOCGE employers have an average pay gap of 17.4% compared to 26% for non-EOCGE employers. In EOCGE organizations, 37.2% of governing body positions are held by women, compared to 31% in other organizations. These employers also offer longer periods of employer-funded parental leave, with more male managers taking primary carer’s leave. Such progress demonstrates that with the right policies and commitment, significant strides toward gender equity can be achieved. Creating a fairer workplace Numerous companies already demonstrate that progress is possible and beneficial for everyone. By fostering inclusive policies, addressing disparities, and supporting diverse leadership, businesses can thrive and contribute to a more equitable world. Action Steps for Organizations: Conduct Regular Pay Audits: Regularly analyze and address any gender pay gaps within your organization. Implement Inclusive Policies: Develop and enforce policies that support work-life balance, such as flexible working hours and parental leave. Promote Female Leadership: Create programs and initiatives to support the advancement of women into leadership roles. Foster an Inclusive Culture: Provide diversity and inclusion training to all employees and create a workplace environment that values and respects all individuals. Monitor and Report Progress: Regularly report on gender equity metrics and set measurable goals to ensure continuous improvement. Invest in Education and Training: Offer educational programs and professional development opportunities that focus on gender equity and awareness. By taking these steps, your organization can actively support gender equity, challenge unfair practices, and contribute to a more inclusive and prosperous workplace, with all the benefits associated. 🌎 Count on Conexus.Earth to guide you! Stay informed, make a difference! Join us in our mission for a sustainable future. Acess our insights and subscribe to our newsletter and stay up-to-date with the latest sustainability news, tips, and trends. Together, let’s create a green and social economy for all. Notice: JavaScript is required for this content. Understanding Gender Equity: impacts and strategies for business success 31/05/2024 Read More ESG Indicators for companies of any size – Join the new era of business! 20/05/2024 Read More Load More

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ESG Indicators for companies of any size – Join the new era of business!

ESG Indicators for companies of any size – Join the new era of business!​ “How do I start?”​ Welcome to the new era of doing business where transparency leads the way. ESG (Environmental, Social, and Governance) has emerged as an essential framework that businesses of all sizes are adopting globally. With increasing awareness and regulatory demands, companies are recognizing that long-term success is closely linked to their ESG performance. Whether you are looking to enhance your brand reputation, comply with new regulations, or do your part for a better world, this guide provides essential insights and practical tools to help you integrate ESG criteria effectively into your business strategy, ensuring you are well-equipped for the future of sustainable business. Reporting ESG Isn’t Rocket Science   Reporting your impact as a company doesn’t have to be complicated. It’s essential for tracking progress and being transparent with stakeholders, which can build trust and attract investors. However, the reporting stage comes after measuring. And to measure, you need to know the right indicators. Shall we explore them? The E in ESG – ENVIRONMENTAL   The Environmental aspect of ESG focuses on a company’s impact on the planet. This includes how they manage their use of resources and their environmental conservation efforts. Here’s a brief look at key areas: Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG):  Companies should measure their carbon footprint to reduce the intensity of climate change in the medium and long term. Questions to consider include:  -What are our total GHG emissions? Are we reducing these emissions? -What is the carbon footprint of our suppliers? -Are there low-emission materials incorporated into our production line? -Are our emissions increasing or decreasing over time? Water Resource Management:  Efficient use of water is crucial to ensure that this scarce resource is being used responsibly. Companies should ask:  -How much water do we consume? What percentage is reused? -What measures are in place to manage water sustainably? Waste Management:  Proper disposal and reduction of waste are vital to ensure that the company is not increasing the problem of waste on the planet. Key questions include: -How much waste do we generate?  -Is the disposal of these materials environmentally correct? -Are we minimizing waste over time? Energy Management:  Monitoring energy consumption helps reduce your carbon emissions. Important metrics to track are:  -How much energy do we use in our operation? What percentage is renewable energy? -What is our strategy for increasing energy efficiency over time? Any goals to achieve?  The S on ESG – SOCIAL  The ‘social’ pillar of ESG focuses on the impact businesses have on people—employees, customers, communities, and other stakeholders. This encompasses everything from labour practices and human rights to community engagement and customer satisfaction. Let’s examine some of the key areas: Fair compensation Crucial to ensure that employees are adequately rewarded for their work, reflecting industry standards and living wage benchmarks. -Are the wages we offer competitive and fair according to industry standards and living wage benchmarks? -What benefits do we provide to support our employees’ health, well-being, and financial security? Do these benefits meet the diverse needs of our workforce? Diversity and inclusion (DAI)  Build a workplace environment where individuals from diverse backgrounds feel valued, respected, and empowered to contribute their unique perspectives. -What are the employee profiles that make up your company in percentage terms? Is there diversity across all departments including leadership positions? -Are there positions designated for candidates with disabilities? -How do we ensure that our hiring process is free from biases, intentional or unintentional? -Is the average salary equal among all employees, regardless of their gender, race, or sexual orientation? Engagement, safety, and culture Make sure to cultivate a supportive organizational culture where employees are genuinely motivated. -What is the employee turnover rate? -Are our working conditions safe and healthy? How frequently do we conduct safety training and audits? -Do we regularly measure employee satisfaction? What mechanisms are in place to address concerns and feedback from staff? The G on ESG – GOVERNANCE Rules, practices, and processes by which a company is directed and controlled. It encompasses the mechanisms through which an organisation ensures accountability, fairness, and transparency in its relationship with all stakeholders Transparency and accountability By providing timely and accurate financial reports and maintaining open communication with stakeholders, companies operate ethically and responsibly. -Are we fully compliant with the tax laws in all jurisdictions where we operate? -Do we provide timely and accurate financial reports to all our stakeholders? -What is our relationship with tax authorities? Board and governing body A diverse board with a mix of skills, backgrounds, and experiences can bring fresh perspectives and insights to governance practices, promoting innovation and strategic decision-making. -Does it have a diverse board and governing body? -Does it have an ethics and compliance committee? -Does it promote the participation of employees at all levels in administrative decisions? ESG Ecosystem The ESG ecosystem extends beyond the boundaries of the company to include its suppliers, partners, and other stakeholders. -Is there a selection criterion for suppliers and partners? Do they also have ESG policies? -Is there a code of ethics for suppliers and partners? What is the communication with them like? Ethics and Integrity By establishing clear policies and codes of conduct, companies can foster trust among stakeholders, and mitigate risks associated with unethical practices. -Are there anti-corruption policies in place? Data protection policy? -Is there a code of ethics for all stakeholders? -Are employees aware of these policies and codes? Overview + the indicators that answer all these questions: (E) Total annual GHG emissions in metric tons of CO2 equivalent. Percentage of GHG emissions reductions The average carbon footprint of suppliers in metric tons of CO2 equivalent. Percentage of low-emission materials used in the production line. Year-over-year percentage change in total GHG emissions. Total annual water usage. Percentage of water reused or recycled. Number of sustainable water management practices implemented. Total annual waste generated in metric tons. Percentage of waste disposed for recycling, circular economy purpose. Year-over-year percentage reduction in

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See how a local brewery on the Gold Coast took impactful steps towards a social and positive green change

See how a local brewery on the Gold Coast took impactful steps towards a social and positive green change. Author: Belén Palkovsky The journey of sustainability can begin at any time and any place. In this case, it started with a pile of 25kg grain bags destined for landfill, a used sewing machine, and an idea. It all began when our co-founder, Francine, observed heaps of used grain bags at a Gold Coast brewery during a casual visit. This sight inspired a sustainable upcycling project that repurposed these bags into useful items, diverting waste from landfills and reducing the brewery’s carbon footprint. But no change is made alone. That’s why she needed to strategically join forces. “I thought to myself: ‘I need to find leftover fabric. I need a seamstress to make a few samples – and I need to join forces with a local organisation.’ And just like that – turning used plastic grain bags into an upcycling project was about to become a reality!” I managed to source some quality leftover fabric from a local store for free—fabric that would have ended up in landfill! Perfect for my prototype, which a friend’s mum was willing to whip up on her Singer. Then I was lucky enough to meet the most wonderful group of women from MFO—Multicultural Families Organisation—and we teamed up to start a sewing group,” Francine tells us about the development of the project. Multicultural Families Organisation (MFO) supports culturally and linguistically diverse migrant families on the Gold Coast. This non-profit organisation is dedicated to facilitating the integration of immigrants into their new communities, providing a variety of services including language classes, employment assistance, and cultural exchange programs. MFO also helps create economic opportunities and promotes sustainable projects that benefit both individuals and the broader community. You can read more about them here! An Upcycling and Circular Economy Project This partnership was rooted in the principle of upcycling, transforming waste materials into new products. Unlike recycling, which often downgrades the quality of the original material, upcycling enhances it, creating higher-quality or different-use items without the need for new raw materials. This significantly reduces energy consumption, water, waste, and costs. This initiative quickly gained traction as the partners collaborated to repurpose the bags, and the project expanded as more machines were donated to meet the growing enthusiasm and scale of production. Can you believe that more than 100 bags have already been made? This project successfully keeps leftover fabrics out of landfills and helps a local brewery reduce the amount of waste they produce, which in turn reduces plastic and CO2 emissions! And what started as a quick insight goes even further—the sewing group has become a place for women to connect, create, and share special skills. This project has empowered multicultural families and strengthened the local community. Here’s how this initiative helped the brewery report and amplify its impact to support global sustainability agendas:   Carbon Reduction: By upcycling used grain bags instead of discarding them, the brewery reduced its carbon footprint, decreasing the greenhouse gas emissions associated with disposal. Sustainability Reporting: Engaging in upcycling projects allowed the brewery to showcase its commitment to sustainability in tangible ways. This was highlighted in Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) reports. Alignment with SDGs: This project has contributed to several Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including achieving gender equality and empowering women (SDG 8), responsible consumption and production (SDG 12), and climate action (SDG 13). Social Impact: The collaboration with local organisations like the Multicultural Families Organisation to carry out the upcycling not only provided social benefits but also strengthened community ties. This social impact can be an essential part of your sustainability reports, demonstrating how your business supports social equity and community development. Circular Economy Integration: By adopting circular economy principles, the brewery moved beyond traditional linear waste management and recycling, instead creating a closed-loop system where materials are reused again and again. So, if you also have a business and are inspired to join the sustainability journey, we have four pieces of advice: Start small: Begin with manageable projects, such as reducing waste or improving recycling practices. Connect with your community: Look for opportunities to involve local organisations or non-profits, which can provide both support and a platform for wider impact. Measure your impact, before and after: Keep track of the changes and improvements made, as this data can be motivating and informative for future decisions. Communicate to the public: Share your goals, processes, and achievements with your customers and stakeholders. Transparency builds trust and enhances your business reputation. Count on Conexus.Earth! We are here to guide you. Just get in touch, and we will be happy to contribute to the enhancement of your business practices. Stay informed, make a difference! Join us in our mission for a sustainable future. Acess our insights and subscribe to our newsletter and stay up-to-date with the latest sustainability news, tips, and trends. Together, let’s create a green and social economy for all. Notice: JavaScript is required for this content. ESG Indicators for companies of any size – Join the new era of business! 20/05/2024 Read More See how a local brewery on the Gold Coast took impactful steps towards a social and positive green change 30/04/2024 Read More Load More

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Keep on track: The Irreversible Path to ESG

The Irreversible Path to ESG​ Keep On Track – ESG Insights for your business! ​ In today’s rapidly evolving business landscape, ESG (Environmental, Social, and Governance) has emerged as a critical framework shaping corporate strategies worldwide. With environmental concerns, social issues, and governance standards taking centre stage, ESG is no longer merely a buzzword but a fundamental paradigm shift driving every business to be more responsible, causing a positive impact on its surroundings. As governments tighten regulations and consumers demand greater transparency and accountability, understanding and integrating the principles of ESG into business operations has become imperative for companies. The problem is that not all companies know exactly where to start or even how to chart a path for this journey. This is where Conexus.Earth comes into play. In this edition, we’ll explain why ESG is important, regardless of the size or sector of your company. Ready? Quick facts to convince you that ESG is here to stay (and adopting these practices can bring numerous opportunities!)   85% of individual investors consider the ESG factor crucial when choosing a company worthy of their trust. Read more about it. 75% of end consumers are willing to pay more for a sustainable product or service. Read more about it. CSRD: EU mandates corporate sustainability reporting starting in 2024, aiming to end greenwashing, bolster the social market economy, and set global sustainability standards, impacting nearly 50,000 EU companies and non-EU entities. Read more about it. GRI updates Biodiversity Standards to promote global transparency and accountability, enabling organizations to disclose significant biodiversity impacts and meet information demands. Read more about it. The Global Sustainable Investment Alliance (GSIA) predicts that by 2025, 50% of global companies will adopt a formal ESG strategy, affecting every corner of the market, even smaller (SMEs) players. Read more about it. According to an analysis by Bloomberg Intelligence, ESG assets could reach $53 trillion by 2025, representing one-third of the total assets under global management. Read more about it. Now that we’re on the same page, how about discussing what’s within our reach today?   By now, you’ve probably realized it’s not an exaggeration to say that the journey to ESG is irreversible. After all, environmental impact reduction, social responsibility, and transparency in business relationships will always exist and evolve (even from laws and regulations established worldwide every day). However, when it comes to local companies with medium and small operations, it can be challenging to compare potential ESG actions with large multinational corporations that have likely been on this path for years. That’s why we’ve dedicated this first edition of our newsletter to share with you what we believe is most important in the early stages of the ESG journey. We hope this information brings numerous benefits to you and your company! Starting with the “E”: Environmental   Most people associate ESG with complicated reporting and million-dollar investments. However, even with limited resources, it’s possible to take the first steps towards a more sustainable and responsible operation (and seize all the opportunities associated with this initiative). Here are 6 important steps to consider: Assess your Environmental Footprint: The first step is to understand the environmental impact of your operations. Evaluate the consumption of natural resources, energy, and water, as well as the carbon emissions associated with your activities. Identifying areas of high impact will help prioritize improvement actions. In this aspect, there are specialised consultancies that can assist you. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle: Implement resource conservation practices, such as reducing the use of paper, energy, and water. Promote the reuse of materials whenever possible and establish an effective recycling system to minimize waste. Adopt Renewable Energy: Consider transitioning to renewable energy sources, such as solar or wind power, to reduce your company’s carbon footprint. Even small changes, like installing solar panels or purchasing green energy, can make a big difference. Raise Awareness: Engage your employees and stakeholders in the environmental cause. Conduct training on sustainable practices, such as energy saving and waste reduction, and encourage participation in environmental conservation initiatives. Establish Goals and Metrics: Set clear and measurable goals to reduce your company’s environmental impact. Monitor your progress regularly and adjust your strategies as needed to ensure you’re moving towards your objectives. Once again, specialized ESG consulting firms can help you set achievable goals and evolve much faster. Attention! Beware of greenwashing: avoid presenting a false image of sustainable practices. Investing in specialized ESG consultancies, adopting transparent metrics, and honestly communicating sustainability efforts are crucial to ensuring environmental integrity and building an authentic reputation for corporate responsibility. It’s much better, to be honest about where you are today and where you want to go than to sacrifice your company’s image with marketing tricks. Next step: Nurturing Human Connections   The “S” of ESG stands for Social Responsibility, encompassing the ethical and societal impact of a company’s operations. It delves into how a business interacts with and affects its employees, communities, and broader society. Fostering a socially responsible business entails prioritizing the well-being of stakeholders, championing diversity and inclusion, and actively contributing to community welfare. Here’s how you can start to think about embedding social responsibility within your organisation: Employee Well-being: Champion your employees’ well-being by ensuring fair compensation, comprehensive benefits, and a secure working environment. Embrace policies such as diversity, equity, and inclusion, fostering a workplace that values and respects everyone. Community Engagement: Forge meaningful connections with your local community through impactful initiatives like volunteer programs, support for educational and healthcare endeavours, and partnerships with nonprofit organizations. By actively contributing to community welfare, you bolster your social footprint and earn trust. Supply Chain Integrity: Uphold ethical standards across your supply chain by collaborating with suppliers who share your dedication to social responsibility. Regularly audit suppliers to uphold labour regulations, fair trade principles, and human rights norms. Diversity and inclusion: There is wide evidence today that a diverse team that feels valued regardless of anything is much more stable and productive. Therefore, promoting more inclusive hiring processes and celebrating employees’

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